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1883 -The Clydesdale Horse


       1883
Introduction to Register of

Horse Breeding Stock
of Lawrence Drew
Merryton Hamilton
 
The Clydesdale Horse

 

` 4 INTRODUCTION
trustworthy servant of the present Duke of Hamilton. He states that James, the sixth Duke, who succeeded to the title in 1742, and died in 1758, imported a dark brown Flemish Stallion for the use of his tenantry free of charge, with the view of improving their breed of farm horses. James Davidson, one of the Dukes grooms led the horse, which travelled in succession the districts of Strathaven, Lesmahagow, Dalserf, Cambuslang, and Shotts, where the principal farms of the Hamilton estate were situated.

` 4 INTRODUCTION
trustworthy servant of the present Duke of Hamilton. He states that James, the sixth Duke, who succeeded to the title in 1742, and died in 1758, imported a dark brown Flemish Stallion for the use of his tenantry free of charge, with the view of improving their breed of farm horses. James Davidson, one of the Dukes grooms led the horse, which travelled in succession the districts of Strathaven, Lesmahagow, Dalserf, Cambuslang, and Shotts, where the principal farms of the Hamilton estate were situated.


The horse was named " Clyde," and the breed originally, and for long, was known from him as the “Clyde" breed, the term "‘Clydesdale‘” being an invention of comparatively recent times, and never adopted by the old farmers. There was a portrait of “ Clyde " in Hamilton palace about 5o years ago, and it is believed to be szi-ll there among the lumber. Were it brought to light it would prove interesting, as “Clyde.” was probably the horse
that founded the reputation of the Lanarkshire breed. He is said by those who have seen his portrait to have resembled the more recent Hamilton stallion " Sir Walter Scott," whose. portrait was removed to Brodick Castle. James Davidson was born in 1731 and died about 1813,, when mr. Bums, who is now 80 years of age was a boy. He remembers Davidson, and has also has a distinct recollection of the reputation of the Flemish stallions progeny,
the special name of “ Clydes" being applied to them, and the subsequent introduction of the term “Clydesdale." Davidson is believed to have led " Clyde " three or four seasons during the life of Duke ]ames.
In an official report drawn up for the Highland Society in 1793. it is remarked - “A high degree of credit is due to the farmers
in the upper part ofthe county for their unremitting endeavour to improve this excellent breed .... Every farm almost through-
out the extent of several parishes supports six, or, at least, four mares, the half of which are arnually in foal. The colts are
mostly sold at the fairs of Lanark and Carnwath, and bring in the owners from £5 to £20. They are generally purchased ‘

 

hi

INT1? OD UC TIOM 5
farmers from the counties of Renfrew and Ayr, where they are
trained for the draught, till they are about live years old; they I -
are then sold at the fairs of Rutherglen at from fag to {ao
each; thence they are taken to the Lothians, England, &c;"
From “ The General View of the Agriculture of Fifesl:ire,"
published in x7g4, by the society referred to, the following
quotation may be submitted :—" The work horses in the county
are also good, having been much improved by the introduction
of horses and mares from Hamilton and Rutherglen, as well 
by mares and stallions from England}?


The horse was named " Clyde," and the breed originally, and for long, was known from him as the “Clyde" breed, the term "‘Clydesdale‘” being an invention of comparatively recent times, and never adopted by the old farmers. There was a portrait of “ Clyde " in Hamilton palace about 5o years ago, and it is believed to be szi-ll there among the lumber. Were it brought to light it would prove interesting, as “Clyde.” was probably the horse
that founded the reputation of the Lanarkshire breed. He is said by those who have seen his portrait to have resembled the more recent Hamilton stallion " Sir Walter Scott," xvhose. portrait was ieuzovcd to Bijodick Castle. lames Davidson was horn in ry; 1, ‘ and died about 1813,, when l\-lr. Bums, who is new So j.··;·;:rs of
age, was a boy. He remembers Davidson, and has also :1 distinct
recollection of the reputation of the Flemish stallioifs pr·._>ge1ig·,
the special name of “ Clydes" being applied to them, ami the
subsequent introduction of the term “Clydesdale." l`)avi·5.sr:n is
believed to have led " Clyde " three or four se.1s;·ns, during the -
life of Duke ]ames.
In an official report drsnvn up for the Highland Society in 1793. _
it is remz1rl:ed—“A high degree of credit is due to the farmers
in the upper part ofthe county for their unremitting endeavour .
to improve this excellent breed .... Every farm almost through-
out the extent of several parishes supports six, or, at least, mir
1`ll3l'tTS, the half of which are arimially in foal. The colts are
mostly sold at the fairsiof Lanark and Carnwath, and lzring th.;
owners from 55 to yfzo. They are generally purchasmi i ‘

 

6 !NT}PODUCT[O1\»Z· -
The amalgamation of selected Scotch and English breeds of ‘
draught horses, so closely allied, cannot correctly be called
" crossing," a term implying the union of different species, or of
dissimilar varieties, for they have many points of resemblance
arising from their similar origin, while defects in either breed
may be modified, or got rid of by judicious mating.

 Thus, the
early Lanarkshire breeders devoted their attention chiefly to the '
securing of good feet and pasterns, so essential to activity and
durability, while the English breeders attached more importance
to weight and syinrnetry of body ; and in many of c-ur noted
modern horses we find both points brought out bythe skilful
union of the two breeds referred to.
Mr. Drew has not considered it necessary to trace lines of
`descent so lar back as is generally done, for he has more con-
ndence in breeding from animals good the-inselves, and those
wliose. ancestors he has seen and itnowzi to be really good, than
from animals with a pedigree, however long, of which he has no
riersonal knowledge.
et.
i

 

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Last Updated on Mar-25-2016